Unreasonable searches and seizures

Miss Mapp and her daughter by a former marriage lived on the top floor of the two-family dwelling. Upon their arrival at that house, the officers knocked on the door and demanded entrance, but appellant, after telephoning her attorney, refused to admit them without a search warrant. They advised their headquarters of the situation and undertook a surveillance of the house.

Unreasonable searches and seizures

The Constitution, through the Fourth Amendment, protects people from unreasonable searches and seizures by the government. The Fourth Amendment, however, is not a guarantee against all searches and seizures, but only those that are deemed unreasonable under the law.

Understanding Search-and-Seizure Law | srmvision.com

On one side of the scale is the intrusion on an individual's Fourth Amendment rights. On the other side of the scale are legitimate government interests, such as public safety. The extent to which an individual is protected by the Fourth Amendment depends, in part, on the location of the search or seizure.

Home Searches and seizures inside a home without a warrant are presumptively unreasonable. New York, U. However, there are some exceptions.

A warrantless search may be lawful: United States, U. A Person When an officer observes unusual conduct which leads him reasonably to conclude that criminal activity may be afoot, the officer may briefly stop the suspicious person and make reasonable inquiries aimed at confirming or dispelling the officer's suspicions.

An officer may conduct a pat-down of the driver and passengers during a lawful traffic stop; the police need not believe that any occupant of the vehicle is involved in a criminal activity.

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The use of a narcotics detection dog to walk around the exterior of a car subject to a valid traffic stop does not require reasonable, explainable suspicion. Special law enforcement concerns will sometimes justify highway stops without any individualized suspicion. An officer at an international border may conduct routine stops and searches.

Montoya de Hernandez, U. A state may use highway sobriety checkpoints for the purpose of combating drunk driving. A state may set up highway checkpoints where the stops are brief and seek voluntary cooperation in the investigation of a recent crime that has occurred on that highway.

However, a state may not use a highway checkpoint program whose primary purpose is the discovery and interdiction of illegal narcotics.

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Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia

The Constitution was written with the intent of protecting citizens and. The Constitution, through the Fourth Amendment, protects people from unreasonable searches and seizures by the government.

The Fourth Amendment, however, is not a guarantee against all searches and seizures, but only those that are deemed unreasonable under the law.

An unreasonable search and seizure is a search and seizure by a law enforcement officer without a search warrant and without probable cause to believe that evidence of a crime is present.

Overview An unreasonable search and seizure is unconstitutional as it violates the Fourth Amendment. unreasonable search and seizure.

Unreasonable searches and seizures

n. search of an individual or his/her premises (including an automobile) and/or seizure of evidence found in such a search by a law enforcement officer without a search warrant and without "probable cause" to believe evidence of a crime is present. The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects personal privacy, and every citizen's right to be free from unreasonable government intrusion into their persons, homes, businesses, and property -- whether through police stops of citizens on the street, arrests, or searches of homes and businesses.

Understanding Search-and-Seizure Law | srmvision.com